David Walker Kennedy

installation view,Green Lands, 2017

installation view,Green Lands, 2017

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    installation view,Green Lands, 2017

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    installation view,Green Lands, 2017

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    installation view,Green Lands, 2017

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    installation view,Green Lands, 2017

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    installation view,Green Lands, 2017

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    installation view,Green Lands, 2017

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    Arrow, photocopy on canvas, suspended steel wire, 160 x 120 x 3 cm, 2017

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    Green Lands , Plaster, jesmonite pigment, polystyrene, MDF, PVA, 160 x 110 x 30cm, 2017

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    Green Lands: Blue flag, Plaster, jesmonite pigment, polystyrene, MDF, PVA, 95 x 75 x 20cm, 2017

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    Awning, Plaster, jesmonite pigment, polystyrene, MDF, PVA, 110 x 30 x 30cm, 2017

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    Green Lands: Blue flag, Plaster, jesmonite pigment, polystyrene, MDF, PVA, 95 x 70 x 30cm, 2017

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    Hand and hand, photocopy on canvas, both 21 x 29.7 x 3 cm, 2017

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    Hand, photocopy on canvas, 21 x 29.7 x 3 cm, 2017

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    Hand, photocopy on canvas, 21 x 29.7 x 3 cm, 2017

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    suspended steel wire (detail), dimensions variable, 2017

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Green Lands, Tontine Studios, Glasgow, UK : 9/6/17-17/6/17

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Taking the title from the Greenland holdings Group – a global real estate developer – Green Lands explores infrastructure space and its effects on nationality.

Infrastructure space is defined by the idea that buildings and urban environments are no longer singularly crafted enclosures but are present as repeatable urban formulae. The offices we work in, the Starbucks that we drink in and the art galleries we visit are part of a multitude of repeatable places which form most of the space in the world. These spaces, rather than exist singularly, act as visualized infrastructure within networks of corporations and economies.

Some of the most profound changes in the globalised world are being written in the spatial information of infrastructure, rather than the language of law and legislation. Infrastructure space acts like software, able to update and change to accommodate new information and requirements, becoming an unlegislated force of global governance.

As this phenomenon renders the nation-state increasingly anachronistic, how can the shift in spatial and legislative power be described?

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Green Lands employs tension, invisible forces, illusion and subversive application of material to explore methods of defining space within a world caught between nationality and globalisation. Comprising of flags, which have become structural - a trapped motion rendered in plaster. Attention is focused on the shape of the object as a means of differentiation rather than graphic design. In these flags – just like a hotel room – the shape changes but the design remains the same. Alongside this are canvas constructions; each work is created by force-feeding canvas through a photocopier in sections which are then constructed together again. Images are derived from cult film ‘Alphaville’ where stark symbolic imagery is used to define the borders of a city state governed by a supercomputer, where poetry, art and irrational action is prohibited. These works illustrate unlegislated forms of governance by describing new methods of controlling and signposting a space.

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